Canvas And Chamomile Painting Class Jan. 9

first_imgThe Canvas and Chamomile painting class is 4 p.m., Jan. 9 at the White Rock Senior Center and 1:30 p.m., Jan. 27 at the Betty Ehart Senior Center. the cost is $25 for members and $30 for nonmembers. No experience is necessary. For registration and questions, call 505.412.1534. Courtesy photolast_img

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Success rates: a blunt instrument for a sophisticated market

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Leybold develops new series

first_imgSource: LeyboldIn order to counteract these risks, Leybold has developed a new protection concept – the Hygienic Enclosures.Encased by these stainless steel enclosures, the vacuum pumps can be positioned near machines and systems without any problems.“On the basis of the protected Leybold vacuum pumps we can create better and more robust solutions for the demanding food applications,” emphasized Product Manager Niels Gorrebeeck. “Of course, this applies all the more to applications such as stuffers, tumblers and of course packaging machines, where the machines and systems are cleaned and disinfected particularly frequently and intensively.” The German company offers users these stainless steel housings in seven different sizes, tailor made of each vacuum pump. In the food industry, vacuum pumps are often placed directly next to the processing and packaging lines and thus not implemented in the equipment.Unprotected pumps are directly exposed to aggressive cleaning media during the rinsing processes.Over time, this leads to corroded vacuum pumps, shorter life cycles, higher costs and ultimately even to food contamination.last_img read more

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Time for the bar to move with the times

first_imgWith legal aid rates squeezed and the ‘threat’ of increased competition from the CPS and solicitor higher court advocates, the bar might reasonably be expected to be looking keenly at survival strategies.It’s surprising, therefore, that the bar has been so slow either to seize the opportunities presented by the Legal Services Act, or perhaps even to recognise them. The Bar Standards Board, after much pressing from the Gazette, revealed it will not be making a final decision until October on the rule changes necessary to enable barristers to join legal disciplinary practices. By then solicitors will have been able to benefit from the provisions in the act for six months. Some 61 firms have already chosen to operate as LDPs. Desmond Browne QC, chairman of the bar, gave an impassioned speech on the future of the publicly funded bar at Westminster this week, during which he criticised the unfairness of the general practice used by the Legal Services Commission in contracting with solicitors, not barristers. The Legal Services Act provides the opportunity for barristers and solicitors to be in business together. They could therefore provide advocacy services jointly, rather than in competition, and would both be involved in any contractual relationship entered into with the LSC. So why does the bar appear content with the glacial pace at which its regulator is moving? Is it lack of knowledge, fear of the unknown, lack of business acumen or just an unwillingness to move with the times?last_img read more

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Building buys a pint … for Chandler KBS

first_imgGet your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Subscribe now for unlimited access Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGINlast_img read more

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Charles Manson, whose cult slayings horrified world, dies

first_imgCharles Manson, whose cult slayings horrified world, dies Do you see a typo or an error? Let us know. LOS ANGELES (AP) Charles Manson, the hippie cult leader who became the hypnotic-eyed face of evil across America after orchestrating the gruesome murders of pregnant actress Sharon Tate and six others in Los Angeles during the summer of 1969, died Sunday after nearly a half-century in prison. He was 83.Manson, whose name to this day is synonymous with unspeakable violence and madness, died at 8:13 p.m. of natural causes at a Kern County hospital, according to a California Department of Corrections statement.Michele Hanisee, president of the Association of Deputy District Attorneys, reacted to the death by quoting the late Vincent Bugliosi, the Los Angeles prosecutor who put Manson behind bars. Bugliosi said: “Manson was an evil, sophisticated con man with twisted and warped moral values.”“Today, Manson’s victims are the ones who should be remembered and mourned on the occasion of his death,” Hanisee said.California Corrections spokeswoman Vicky Waters said it’s “to be determined” what happens to Manson’s body. Prison officials previously said Manson had no known next of kin and state law says that if no relative or legal representative surfaces within 10 days, then it’s up to the department to determine whether the body is cremated or buried.It’s not known if Manson requested funeral services of any sort. It’s also unclear what happens to his property, which is said to include artwork and at least two guitars. State law says the department must maintain his property for up to a year in anticipation there might be legal battles over who can make a legitimate claim to it.A petty criminal who had been in and out of jail since childhood, the charismatic, guru-like Manson surrounded himself in the 1960s with runaways and other lost souls and then sent his disciples to butcher some of L.A.’s rich and famous in what prosecutors said was a bid to trigger a race war – an idea he got from a twisted reading of the Beatles song “Helter Skelter.”MORE: Reports: Charles Manson hospitalizedThe slayings horrified the world and, together with the deadly violence that erupted later in 1969 during a Rolling Stones concert at California’s Altamont Speedway, exposed the dangerous, drugged-out underside of the counterculture movement and seemed to mark the death of the era of peace and love.Despite the overwhelming evidence against him, Manson maintained during his tumultuous trial in 1970 that he was innocent and that society itself was guilty.“These children that come at you with knives, they are your children. You taught them; I didn’t teach them. I just tried to help them stand up,” he said in a courtroom soliloquy.Linda Deutsch, the longtime courts reporter for The Associated Press who covered the Manson case, said he “left a legacy of evil and hate and murder.”“He was able to take young people who were impressionable and convince them he had the answer to everything and he turned them into killers,” she said. “It was beyond anything we had ever seen before in this country.”The Manson Family, as his followers were called, slaughtered five of its victims on Aug. 9, 1969, at Tate’s home: the actress, who was 8½ months pregnant, coffee heiress Abigail Folger, celebrity hairdresser Jay Sebring, Polish movie director Voityck Frykowski and Steven Parent, a friend of the estate’s caretaker. Tate’s husband, “Rosemary’s Baby” director Roman Polanski, was out of the country at the time.The next night, a wealthy grocer and his wife, Leno and Rosemary LaBianca, were stabbed to death in their home across town.The killers scrawled such phrases as “Pigs” and “Healter Skelter” (sic) in blood at the crime scenes.Three months later, a Manson follower was jailed on an unrelated charge and told a cellmate about the bloodbath, leading to the cult leader’s arrest.In the annals of American crime, Manson became the embodiment of evil, a short, shaggy-haired, bearded figure with a demonic stare and an “X” – later turned into a swastika – carved into his forehead.“Many people I know in Los Angeles believe that the Sixties ended abruptly on August 9, 1969,” author Joan Didion wrote in her 1979 book “The White Album.”After a trial that lasted nearly a year, Manson and three followers – Susan Atkins, Patricia Krenwinkel and Leslie Van Houten – were found guilty of murder and sentenced to death. Another defendant, Charles “Tex” Watson, was convicted later. All were spared execution and given life sentences after the California Supreme Court struck down the death penalty in 1972.Atkins died behind bars in 2009. Krenwinkel, Van Houten and Watson remain in prison.Another Manson devotee, Lynette “Squeaky” Fromme, tried to assassinate President Gerald Ford in 1975, but her gun jammed. She served 34 years in prison.Manson was born in Cincinnati on Nov. 12, 1934, to a teenager, possibly a prostitute, and was in reform school by the time he was 8. After serving a 10-year sentence for check forgery in the 1960s, Manson was said to have pleaded with authorities not to release him because he considered prison home.“My father is the jailhouse. My father is your system,” he would later say in a monologue on the witness stand. “I am only what you made me. I am only a reflection of you.”He was set free in San Francisco during the heyday of the hippie movement in the city’s Haight-Ashbury section, and though he was in his mid-30s by then, he began collecting followers – mostly women – who likened him to Jesus Christ. Most were teenagers; many came from good homes but were at odds with their parents.The “family” eventually established a commune-like base at the Spahn Ranch, a ramshackle former movie location outside Los Angeles, where Manson manipulated his followers with drugs, supervised orgies and subjected them to bizarre lectures.He had musical ambitions and befriended rock stars, including Beach Boy Dennis Wilson. He also met Terry Melcher, a music producer who had lived in the same house that Polanski and Tate later rented.By the summer 1969, Manson had failed to sell his songs, and the rejection was later seen as a trigger for the violence. He complained that Wilson took a Manson song called “Cease to Exist,” revised it into “Never Learn Not to Love” and recorded it with the Beach Boys without giving Manson credit.Manson was obsessed with Beatles music, particularly “Piggies” and “Helter Skelter,” a hard-rocking song that he interpreted as forecasting the end of the world. He told his followers that “Helter Skelter is coming down” and predicted a race war would destroy the planet.“Everybody attached themselves to us, whether it was our fault or not,” the Beatles’ George Harrison, who wrote “Piggies,” later said of the murders. “It was upsetting to be associated with something so sleazy as Charles Manson.”According to testimony, Manson sent his devotees out on the night of Tate’s murder with instructions to “do something witchy.” The state’s star witness, Linda Kasabian, who was granted immunity, testified that Manson tied up the LaBiancas, then ordered his followers to kill. But Manson insisted: “I have killed no one, and I have ordered no one to be killed.”MORE: Manson back at Central California prison after hospital stayHis trial was nearly scuttled when President Richard Nixon said Manson was “guilty, directly or indirectly.” Manson grabbed a newspaper and held up the front-page headline for jurors to read: “Manson Guilty, Nixon Declares.” Attorneys demanded a mistrial but were turned down.From then on, jurors, sequestered at a hotel for 10 months, traveled to and from the courtroom in buses with blacked-out windows so they could not read the headlines on newsstands.Manson was also later convicted of the slayings of musician Gary Hinman and stuntman Donald “Shorty” Shea.Over the decades, Manson and his followers appeared sporadically at parole hearings, where their bids for freedom were repeatedly rejected. The women suggested they had been rehabilitated, but Manson himself stopped attending, saying prison had become his home.The killings inspired movies and TV shows, and Bugliosi wrote a best-selling book about the murders, “Helter Skelter.” The macabre shock rocker Marilyn Manson borrowed part of his stage name from the killer.“The Manson case, to this day, remains one of the most chilling in crime history,” prominent criminal justice reporter Theo Wilson wrote in her 1998 memoir, “Headline Justice: Inside the Courtroom – The Country’s Most Controversial Trials .”“Even people who were not yet born when the murders took place,” Wilson wrote, “know the name Charles Manson, and shudder.” Recommended Published: November 20, 2017 5:10 AM EST Updated: November 20, 2017 5:14 AM EST center_img Author: AP After almost 50 years, Charles Manson follower recommended for parole SHARElast_img read more

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Stations for mobile workers

first_imgNETHERLANDS: Serviced office company Regus and Dutch national passenger operator NS have opened their first station2station business lounge at Amersfoort station, and are planning to develop a total of 13 drop-in office facilities at inter-city stations by the end of the year.The lounges provide access to office facilities including include workstations, meeting rooms, wi-fi, video conferencing, administrative support and tea and coffee. Workers can drop in to use the internet, complete paperwork, print documents, and meet colleagues or customers. Regus has undertaken similar projects in partnership with SNCF and Trenitalia. ‘The remarkable potential of mobile, tablet and cloud technology is wasted if workers cannot find somewhere conducive to use it’, said Regus CEO Mark Dixon. ‘People need access to work space, be that a quiet space to think, or decent printing facilities, maybe just for 20 min at a time.’last_img read more

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St. Kitts & Nevis Independence Spotlight: Avonelle Hanley-Green

first_imgBorn in: NevisLives in: Fort LauderdaleMoved to FL: 1988Life’s Passion: Avonelle balances life here as a businesswoman, proud mother of two, and “proud founder and vice-president of the Nevis Association of South Florida.” In particular, Avonelle prides herself in instilling the Nevisian cultural legacy for her children, so they can appreciate where their roots. “I love being able to reminisce about the beauty of life on the island and contrast it with life here. And at the same time discuss life here in the Diaspora.”Miss most about home: Like our other interviewees, though she enjoys her work as a Medicare sales representative, Avonelle does find herself at times longing for “the slower pace and the more laid-back lifestyle” of Nevis – “just the fact that we knew each other on a personal basis, and we cared about and for each other.”What makes her a proud Nevisian-American: Avonelle is most proud of her piece of the American dream, from achieving a college degree to “putting my own two children through college, and seeing one of them graduate.” But she also most cherishes the opportunities she has “to assist my family and other back home in various ways.”last_img read more

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Thieves targeting churches in Grenada

first_img Share Tweet Sharing is caring! 19 Views   no discussions NewsRegional Thieves targeting churches in Grenada by: – December 18, 2013center_img Share Share ST. GEORGE’S, Grenada, Wednesday December 18, 2013, CMC – Grenada police were urging churches to be much more vigilant especially over the Christmas season after indicating that the religious buildings were the targets for thieves in recent weeks.Head of the Community Relations Department of the Police Force, Rebecca Jones, said that law enforcement authorities have noted that over the past six months, thieves have been breaking into churches and stealing musical instruments and sacramental wines.“It’s not a case where we are seeing people stealing food from the churches but valuable things such as musical instruments, sacramental wines and even candles,” she added.She said the police were urging the churches to increase safety measures particularly over the festive season, adding that the police are not certain whether or not there is an underground market for musical instruments.A police statement urged church administrators to ensure that their buildings are properly secured.“Members are encouraged to pay particular attention to opportunist thieves in their congregation who may be visiting for illicit purposes,” said the statement which encouraged church members who live in close proximity to make periodic checks on church buildings and report anything suspicious to the police. Caribbean Media Corporationlast_img read more

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Continental Announces Fifth Generation Radar Sensors for Automated Driving

first_imgContinental has introduced the fifth generation of its short- and long-range radar sensors. The new generation will enter series production in 2019 and will feature greater capacity, catering to vehicle manufacturers’ different requirements and electrical-electronic (E/E) architectures as it is based on a scalable modular principle. Thanks to the worldwide trend of using 77 GHz technology, the sensor resolution increases and can detect smaller objects, such as an exhaust pipe that has fallen off, more accurately. With long-range radar, a range of up to 900 feet and an opening angle of ±60° are possible in the highest expansion stage depending on the required performance. With short-range radar, precise parking functions can be executed easily for the first time, in addition to functions such as blind spot detection, lane change assist or rear cross traffic alert.Continental’s radar sensors are based on a highly sophisticated radar technology that benefits from four generations and almost 30 million units in series deployment to date. Measured against the scope of its performance, the development leap of the new generation lies in its compactness and flexible usage. The image of the surroundings produced by the radar is sent to a central control unit such as the Assisted & Automated Driving Control Unit. In this way, different E/E architectures of vehicles can be covered using a single sensor concept. In addition to today’s standards for bus systems, such as High-Speed CAN and CAN-FD, the fifth generation is already prepared for Automotive Ethernet, thanks to the hardware concept, which ensures that the necessary bandwidth for transmitting sensor raw data to the Assisted & Automated Driving Control Unit is available.One of the features of the new generation is a higher resolution compared to previous radar generations, enabling a more exact snapshot of the current traffic situation. In addition, road boundaries like curbstones as well as the height of objects, such as the end of a traffic jam under a bridge are detected thanks to the sensors’ evaluation measurement accuracy. Even the entry-level variant of the long-range radar has a range of 600 feet and an opening angle of ±45°. The expansion stage currently in preparation will look 900 feet ahead, with an opening angle of ±60°.When four of the short-range radar sensors are installed on the corners of a vehicle, the wider opening angle and higher resolution facilitate a seamless 360° radar “safety belt” all the way around the vehicle. Such a detailed and seamless display of the entire area surrounding the vehicle is important, since the vehicle would not be able to take on the driver’s tasks in automated driving otherwise. In conjunction with other sensors, such as a camera, surround view systems and 3D Flash LiDAR, the goal of achieving an understanding of the vehicle surrounding that is equal to or even better than that of a human being is coming closer.One of the established features of Continental’s radar sensors is also found in the fifth generation – Auto-alignment. The sensors use a software function to automatically correct deviations from the sensor’s ideal location at its installation location on the vehicle. In order to meet the rising demand worldwide, Continental is constantly expanding its production capacities. Production of long-range radar sensors was launched in Shanghai, China, in October of this year with the goal of producing several million units a year in order to meet the local high demand. The sensors are also produced in Germany, the U.S. and the Philippines.Continental will be talking about this next radar generation at the CES 2018 in Las Vegas to be held from January 9 – January 12.last_img read more

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